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Profile [BAT] tutta55
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Message 2887 - Posted: 21 Sep 2007, 9:53:38 UTC

I find the scientific field of this project most interesting, but also quite hard to grasp. Could you please give some recommendations for literature that explains the studied issues on a beginner's to intermediate reading level? It can also (maybe preferrably) be works that provide more global insights about what makes up our universe, from the visible to the invisible.

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Message 2937 - Posted: 25 Sep 2007, 19:28:44 UTC

About the universe you should readt A brief history of time by Prof. Stephen Hawking.The man is a living legend and his book proves it
Also BANG! A complete history of the universe by Brian May,Patrick Moore,Chris Lintott offers a very-accesible way of understanding the big bang
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Message 2940 - Posted: 25 Sep 2007, 20:36:09 UTC - in response to Message 2937.  

About the universe you should readt A brief history of time by Prof. Stephen Hawking.The man is a living legend and his book proves it
Also BANG! A complete history of the universe by Brian May,Patrick Moore,Chris Lintott offers a very-accesible way of understanding the big bang


I second A Brief History of Time, it's great book.
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Message 2945 - Posted: 26 Sep 2007, 10:53:51 UTC - in response to Message 2940.  

About the universe you should readt A brief history of time by Prof. Stephen Hawking.The man is a living legend and his book proves it
Also BANG! A complete history of the universe by Brian May,Patrick Moore,Chris Lintott offers a very-accesible way of understanding the big bang


I second A Brief History of Time, it's great book.



I'll third it. It was an excellent read.
Kathryn :o)
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Message 2948 - Posted: 26 Sep 2007, 15:00:43 UTC

Recently Hawking and his daughter wrote a children's book explaining A brief history of time to the younger readers.
The book's name is George's secret key to the universe
Sounds interesting,too
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Message 2959 - Posted: 27 Sep 2007, 1:27:13 UTC - in response to Message 2948.  

Martin Beltov wrote:
Recently Hawking and his daughter wrote a children's book explaining A brief history of time to the younger readers.
The book's name is George's secret key to the universe

Thanks! I wasn't aware of this. It might help me out (seriously).
A Brief History of Time holds the record for me as the hardest read ever. No speed reading possible.
I had to read it 3 times consecutivly and still I know much went way over my head. Even on 1st read I had to go over many parts several times to understand. His explanation of 1/2 spin particles comes to mind. But after I finally understood, I became almost dizzy with joy! A lot of the book was like that for me.
Later I purchased The Illustrated A Brief History of Time and it remains the only book I purchased 2 different versions of.
Now it seems to me it'll be the only book I might want 3 versions of.

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Message 2962 - Posted: 27 Sep 2007, 4:43:21 UTC - in response to Message 2959.  

Martin Beltov wrote:[quote]A Brief History of Time holds the record for me as the hardest read ever. No speed reading possible.
I had to read it 3 times consecutivly and still I know much went way over my head. Even on 1st read I had to go over many parts several times to understand. His explanation of 1/2 spin particles comes to mind. But after I finally understood, I became almost dizzy with joy! A lot of the book was like that for me.

Reading books at the upper limit of one's intellect can be very rewarding. A lot of kids get bad grades in school simply because the work isn't challenging enough.(Strange but true)
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Message 2966 - Posted: 28 Sep 2007, 4:16:09 UTC - in response to Message 2962.  

A lot of kids get bad grades in school simply because the work isn't challenging enough.(Strange but true)
Not strange at all. I was in a grade 8 class in school with a genius. Not only did he often receive poor marks, but he eventually dropped out!
I was stunned. Until I realized that boredom is a killer. Now I see homeless on the streets and know that some of these folks are actually very intelligent. To this day I look to see if it might find my friend John there. I wonder if many suicides are committed by very intelligent, but bored humans. After I 1st quit smoking it came to me that I smoked out of boredom. Yep, boredom is a killer.
Okay, let me try to bring this thread back on track with a couple other books I would recommend.

  • The Matter Myth by Paul Davies and John Gribbon.
  • The Hour of Our Delight by Hubert Reeves.


Both of these are slightly outdated but well worth the read.

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Message 2975 - Posted: 29 Sep 2007, 7:47:17 UTC

Also recently I became interested in more strange things like parallel universes,string theory and things like that.
So I started to read Parallel Universes by Michio Kaku.
I really like how he explains things.You can see him in most discovery films.
I really would like to read his others books ,but where I live (Bulgaria) they aren't sold :(.
Maybe I will try to order them from the internet
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Message 3018 - Posted: 30 Sep 2007, 19:35:14 UTC
Last modified: 30 Sep 2007, 19:39:30 UTC

Hi,

I can heartily recommend The Cosmic Landscape - String Theory and the Illusion of Intelligent Design by Leonard Susskind. It deals with the Anthropic Principle and is written for the general public.

Amazon.co.uk link
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Message 3019 - Posted: 30 Sep 2007, 19:59:15 UTC - in response to Message 2966.  



  • The Matter Myth by Paul Davies and John Gribbon.
  • The Hour of Our Delight by Hubert Reeves.


Both of these are slightly outdated but well worth the read.



Can't say I've read The Matter Myth, but Paul Davies was actually my first year Professor doing Quantum Mechanics back in '89 at Newcastle University. He moved to Australia after that. Was a very good teacher... I've read a cople of his earlier books.


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Message 3031 - Posted: 1 Oct 2007, 7:53:59 UTC

Thanks for the response so far. I now know what to put on my Christmas gift wish list :p

If there are further suggestions or comments, please keep them coming. I'm sure I'm not the only one interested.
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Message 3040 - Posted: 1 Oct 2007, 21:21:58 UTC - in response to Message 3031.  

Thanks for the response so far. I now know what to put on my Christmas gift wish list :p

If there are further suggestions or comments, please keep them coming. I'm sure I'm not the only one interested.


There is an other very good book:
"The fabric of the Cosmos", written by Brian Greene
in German:
"Der Stoff aus dem der Kosmos ist; Raum, Zeit und die Beschaffenheit der Wirklichkeit", published by Pantheon-Verlag.
This one is the best book I ever read about cosmology. Brian Greene describes the universe in best words, so everybody can understand it.

With best regards
MSE29

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Message 3050 - Posted: 2 Oct 2007, 12:09:36 UTC - in response to Message 3040.  

There is an other very good book:
"The fabric of the Cosmos", written by Brian Greene
in German:
"Der Stoff aus dem der Kosmos ist; Raum, Zeit und die Beschaffenheit der Wirklichkeit", published by Pantheon-Verlag.
This one is the best book I ever read about cosmology. Brian Greene describes the universe in best words, so everybody can understand it.

With best regards
MSE29


Brian Greene also has another book I enjoyed.

"The Elegant Universe"

PBS's Nova also did a three hour series with the same title. It used to up for viewing on the Nova website. And you can get it outside the US because I watched it the last time I was in Korea.


I read and enjoyed part of Lisa Randall's book, Warped Passages. But it's tough. Unfortunately someone else wanted the book from the library before I was finished with it.

Kathryn :o)
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Message 3052 - Posted: 2 Oct 2007, 15:15:50 UTC - in response to Message 3050.  


Brian Greene also has another book I enjoyed.

"The Elegant Universe"

PBS's Nova also did a three hour series with the same title. It used to up for viewing on the Nova website. And you can get it outside the US because I watched it the last time I was in Korea.


I read and enjoyed part of Lisa Randall's book, Warped Passages. But it's tough. Unfortunately someone else wanted the book from the library before I was finished with it.


Oh yes! In German is named "Das elegante Universum". So hurry up me, it's the next book to be read. I'll hope it will be as good as the last one.

With best regards,
MSE29
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Message 3146 - Posted: 7 Oct 2007, 19:57:17 UTC

I am reading Parallel Universes now.
Very-interesting so far
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Message 3335 - Posted: 21 Oct 2007, 15:27:30 UTC

I recommend "Many Worlds in One" by Alex Vilenkin.
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Message 3338 - Posted: 21 Oct 2007, 17:50:03 UTC

Let's not forget Wrinkles in time by George Smoot. Perhaps a little outdated, but still good.
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Message 9719 - Posted: 30 Nov 2011, 23:57:01 UTC - in response to Message 3338.  

I have been updating a list recently about literature recommendations. It can be found here:

http://www.cosmologyathome.org/forum_thread.php?id=496

Faik
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Forums : Cosmology and Astronomy : Literature recommendations?